Kuenzi Family Pet Hospital offers microchip identification for pets. We use Datamars pet identification system. You can rest easy knowing your pet is protected – whether you are at home or you take them out of town.

Pet Microchip and Grain of RicePlease call us at (262) 547-9370.

Did you know that getting lost is the No. 1 cause of death for pets?

One in three pets goes missing during its lifetime and without identification, 90 percent of pets never return home. Microchip implantation causes no more discomfort than a vaccination and is a simple one-time insertion with a syringe.

Almost all humane organizations have scanners that read microchip IDs.

Pet Microchipping FAQs

What is a microchip?

A microchip is a small, electronic chip that is about the same size as a grain of rice. The microchip is activated by a scanner that is passed over the area, and the radio-waves put out by the scanner activate the chip. The chip transmits the identification number to the scanner, which displays the number on the screen.

How is a microchip implanted into an animal? Is it painful? Does it require surgery or anesthesia?

It is injected under the skin using a hypodermic needle. It is no more painful than a typical injection, although the needle is slightly larger than those used for injection. No surgery or anesthesia is required — a microchip can be implanted during a routine veterinary office visit. If your pet is already under anesthesia for a procedure, such as neutering or spaying, the microchip can often be implanted while they're still under anesthesia.

How does a microchip help reunite a lost animal with its owner?

When an animal is found and taken to a shelter or veterinary clinic, one of the first things they do is scan the animal for a microchip. If they find a microchip, and if the microchip registry has accurate information, they can quickly find the animal's owner.

Does a microchip replace identification tags and rabies tags?

Absolutely not. Microchips are great for permanent identification that is tamper-proof, but nothing replaces a collar with up-to-date identification tags. Your pet's rabies tag should always be on its collar, so people can quickly see that your pet has been vaccinated for this deadly disease. Tag numbers also allow tracing of animals and identification of a lost animal's owner, but it can be hard to trace after veterinary clinics or county office are closed for the day.

I want to get my animal(s) microchipped. Where do I go?

To your veterinarian, of course! Most veterinary clinics keep microchips on hand; so, it is likely that your pet can be implanted with a microchip the same day as your appointment.

What should I do to "maintain" my pet's microchip?

Once your pet is microchipped, there are only three things you need to do:

  1. make sure the microchip is registered;
  2. ask your veterinarian to scan your pet's microchip at least once per year to make sure the microchip is still functioning and can be detected; and
  3. keep your registration information up-to-date.

If you've moved, or if any of your information (especially your phone number) has changed, make sure you update your microchip registration in the manufacturer's database as soon as possible.

There are many databases that allow you to register your pet's microchip, but the one that really counts – the one that animal shelters and veterinarians will search – is the database maintained by the manufacturer of your pet’s microchip. AAHA’s Pet Microchip Lookup, an internet-based application, is linked to the registries of the majority of microchip manufacturers and allows a quick database search of any microchip made by these manufacturers.